Log In / Register

Dashboard

Log in using...

New Search X

Neighborhood Spotlight: Angelino Heights, Los Angeles

Written by Kelly Weimert on Wednesday, October 31st, 2018 at 4:06am.

Image credit: lamag.com

Founded in 1886, the Los Angeles neighborhood of Angelino Heights is equally rich in history and beautiful architecture. The neighborhood is located atop a 502-foot hill and falls within Echo Park and Chinatown proper.

Formerly spelled Angeleno Heights, this neighborhood boasts the second-oldest district in Los Angeles, with Downtown being the first. It’s also the first City of Los Angeles-recognized historic district, established in 1983, which means unsympathetic remodeling of historic houses in the ‘hood is prohibited and all new construction must resemble the neighborhood’s original architecture in material, scale, and massing.

The neighborhood’s founders, William W. Stilson and Everett E. Hall, capitalized on its location on top of a hill, endeavoring to create an upper-crust neighborhood for the wealthy elite to overlook the city. Lots were expensive for 1886, selling for $500, but many opted to buy them for the neighborhood’s prestige and connection to the horse-drawn Temple Street Cable Railway. However, this initial interest waned in just a couple of years as an economic slump took hold of the city and trolley service became hit or miss. Still, Stilson was able to build 51 Victorian homes before the economy took its toll.

After Stilson died, his son, Fielding, took over much of the neighborhood’s construction. Rather than sticking to grand, elegant Victorian style mansions, Stilson opted for more varied and accessible architectural styles, like Craftsman, Bungalow, and Mission Revival. Thanks to streetcars being electrified in 1902, by 1909 there were five trolley lines serving Angelino Heights. This increased accessibility coupled with the hilltop location and compelling architecture resulted in many silent screen stars, like Mary Pickford and Gloria Swanson, building homes in the neighborhood by the 1920s.

These days, a walk through this historic neighborhood will greet you with a wide range of beautiful architectural styles—some brand new and some expertly restored. In fact, you might even recognize a few of them, like the Sanders House, a Queen Anne-style home located at 1345 Carroll Ave and was the setting for Michael Jackson’s infamous Thriller video. It was also featured in the TV show Charmed and the 1989 movie Teen Witch.

Sanders House

Michael Jackson Thriller House in Angelino Heights

Image credit: lamag.com

In addition to its more famous dwellings, Angelino Heights is home to lesser-known but equally compelling houses in a variety of architectural styles. We handpicked a few of our favorites for you to check out below.

Sessions House

Victorian Style Sessions House Angelino Heights

Image credit: laconservancy.org

Built during the neighborhood’s rise in 1889 by architect Joseph Cather Newsom, the Sessions House is a stunning example of Queen Anne-style architecture.

Innes House

Charmed Innes House Angelino Heights

Image credit: laconservancy.org

Also featured on the TV show Charmed, the Innes House is one of the original homes constructed in this neighborhood. It was built for Daniel Innes, a prominent real estate developer and city councilman.

Haskins House

Victorian Style Haskins House Angelino Heights

Image credit: bigorangelandmarks.blogspot.com

With its fish-scale shingles, curvy columns, and sunburst patterns, the Haskins House is the picture of Victorian opulence. Both the interior and exterior are fully restored.

Angelino Heights Walking Tour

Interested in taking a tour? See these homes up close and personal. The LA Conservancy hosts weekly tours through Angelino Heights on the first Saturday of every month at 9:45am. But you'll need to make a reservation - these tours fill up quickly! Get all the info here.

Homes for Sale in Angelino Heights

Loving this historic neighborhood and thinking about calling it home? Check out homes for sale in Angelino Heights.

Leave a Comment