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Architecture

Found 91 blog entries about Architecture.

Source: hgtv.com

With their timeless charm and abundant value, both literal and figurative, there’s a lot to love about owning a historic home. However, a major drawback of living in an old house is that, at some point, it invariably needs some work to remain functional. There are several approaches you can take to ensuring your historic home stays in strong working order, topmost among them being rehabilitation and restoration. 

While the terms “rehabilitation" and “restoration" may seem nearly interchangeable, they actually mean two very different things. When it comes to architecture, rehabilitation is the process of returning a structure to a useful state through contemporary repairs and modifications, while restoration works to retain the

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Source: digs.net

When it comes to architects to the stars, few are more iconic than John Woolf. Born in 1910 in Atlanta, Georgia, Woolf studied architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology before moving to Hollywood in 1936. Initially, Woolf hoped his Southern accent would secure him a role in Gone With the Wind, but when he met the film’s director, George Cukor, his career took a very different turn. 

While Woolf didn’t land a part in the film, he and Cukor formed a strong friendship that would pave the way for Woolf’s architecture career. Through Cukor, Woolf met many influential Hollywood figures who took interest in the architect’s drawings, including art dealer and interior decorator James Pendleton and his wife, Mary Frances. The two

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For centuries, log cabins have been an architectural staple in the United States, coveted for their straightforward construction and charming design. Over the years, log cabins have evolved considerably from their humble beginnings, with many people opting for modern takes on the traditional design. But the modernization of a log cabin’s exterior also calls for updates to the interior, which requires a bit of a balancing act between traditional and contemporary design. 

The following tips make it easy to cultivate a contemporary, personal interior while honoring the charming, rustic features that made log cabins such a beloved architectural style. 

 

Mix Materials

Modern Contemporary Log Cabin Living Room
Source: houzz.com

Rather than add wood on wood, as is done traditionally in

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Source: archpaper.com

Barbara Bestor is a ground-breaking architect known for experimental designs and masterful renovations. Bestor knew in the eighth grade that she wanted to be an architect, eventually joining the likes of Rem Koolhaas and Zaha Hadid by studying abroad at the Architectural Association in London for a year before earning her degree from Harvard in 1987. Bestor went on to earn a master’s in architecture from the Southern California Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles in 1992. 

The architect began practicing shortly after graduating with her master’s degree. She earned early acclaim for her inventive and meticulous renovations of Los Angeles residences, which led to her becoming a go-to preservationist, renovating homes by

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Source: midcenturyhome.com

Blending the indoors with the outdoors is one of the defining characteristics of mid-century modern architecture, and it’s likely among the primary reasons that the architectural style has seen a resurgence in recent years. In today’s highly technological world, many of us are craving more nature in our lives, and the indoor-outdoor harmony of modernist homes makes it easy to get a daily dose of Mother Nature. 

That being said, the style’s connection to the outside world means that it’s critical to give thoughtful attention to the outdoor landscape to maximize the home’s potential. And if you don’t have a ton of experience on the landscaping front, it can be tough to figure out where to even start, so we’ve done it for

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With so many different architectural styles out there, it’s tough to choose a favorite, but the gingerbread variety might be the winner. The delicious holiday staple often nods to historic styles of architecture, particularly Victorian, and instantly brings about quintessential warm and fuzzy holiday feelings. But the delicious type isn’t the only kind of gingerbread house out there. 

In honor of National Gingerbread House Day, December 12th, we’re showcasing some of the best real-life gingerbread houses around, some of which you can treat yourself to dining in or renting for a few nights. And it’s the type of holiday treat that you don’t need to burn off at the gym, which makes it all the better. 

 

Fairytale Gingerbread House

Real Life Fairytale Gingerbread House

Located in

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Source: modtraveler.net

Located in Palm Springs, Twin Palms is a charming neighborhood that’s largely responsible for the desert town’s reputation for being a hub of mid-century modern design. The neighborhood is the area's first modernist tract, thanks to architect William Krisel who designed 90 residences for the land between 1956-1959. 

Twin Palms gets its name from the pair of palm trees that were added to all of the residences’ front laws, but the immediate visual similarities end there. Despite the tract housing, which all shared virtually the same floor plan, Krisel’s artful design choices resulted in each of the houses appearing as custom-built properties. He used various orientations, embellishments, and setbacks to give every home a unique

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Source: laconservancy.org

Born in 1922, Richard Dorman was raised in Los Angeles and helped shape the architectural landscape of the city. Before he was an architect, Dorman fought in World War II as a pilot, flying 35 missions over the Pacific. After the war, Dorman used funds from the GI Bill to attend architecture school at the University of Southern California. 

Upon graduating from USC, Dorman was invited to work for Welton Becket and Associates where he was the assistant chief designer for five years before leaving to start his own architectural firm in 1956. Initially, the architect primarily designed industrial buildings, but he ultimately moved on to the commercial and residential designs for which he became most popular. 

Dorman was

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Source: onekindesign.com

Rising to popularity in the early 20th century, bungalow-style homes are beloved for their simple, straightforward construction and breezy open floor plans. And while there are infinite ways to outfit an interior, if you’re lucky enough to call this historic architectural style home, then you might be looking for ways to decorate it that enhance its welcoming charm. 

The following tips are designed to maximize the style of a bungalow home and apply to a broad range of aesthetics, so they’re easy to incorporate no matter your unique design sensibility.  

 

Incorporate Light, Neutral Walls

Bungalow Architectural Interior Wall Colors
Source: onekindesign.com

The small size of bungalow homes means that busy wallpaper patterns and bright wall colors can quickly

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Source: latimes.com

William Krisel is among the pioneering architects who helped define and drive affordable, modernist tract housing in Southern California. Born in Shanghai in 1924 to American parents who were working abroad for the U.S. State Department, Krisel drafted his first house at just 11 years old. Krisel’s father sent the drawing to an architect who said that Krisel had the talent to become an architect himself, which is exactly what he did. 

Krisel remained in China until he was 13 before moving back to the United States. When he was 18, Krisel was assigned as a Chinese interpreter during World War II. While in the Army, he spoke with other soldiers about their plans for after the war, which ultimately informed his architectural

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